Diesel Ambient, Design & Branding, Case study KNEE J by Happy

KNEE J

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Industry Apparel, Clothing & Footwear, Accessories, Bags, Leather, Watches & Eyewear
Media Ambient, Design & Branding, Case study
Market India
Agency Happy
Creative Director Kartik Iyer
Art Director Praveen Das
Copywriter Sanaa Abdussamad
Illustrator Rishidev R.k
Released December 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Self Promotion
Advertiser: DIESEL RELIANCE BRANDS
Product/Service: DIESEL RELIANCE BRANDS
Agency: HAPPY CREATIVE SERVICES
Date of First Appearance: May 2 2010
Entrant Company: HAPPY CREATIVE SERVICES, Bangalore, INDIA
Creative Director: Kartik Iyer (Happy Creative Services)
Creative Director: Praveen Das (Happy Creative Services)
Designer: Praveen Das (Happy Creative Services)
Art Director: Praveen Das (Happy Creative Services)
Art Director: Pradeep Kumar (Happy Creative Services)
Copywriter: Sanaa Abdussamad (Happy Creative Services)
Illustrator: Rishidev RK (Happy Creative Services)
Studio Head: Ramakrishna R (Happy Creative Services)
Account Manager: Ravi Bhat (Happy Creative Services)
Media placement: Packaging - In-Store - 2nd May 2010
Describe the brief from the client
To come up with an in-store promotion idea to run along with the ‘Sex sells. Unfortunately we sell jeans’ campaign to help increase sales.
Describe the challenges and key objectives
The idea needed to grab eyeballs in the store, while keeping the Diesel flavour intact, with the increase in sales as the final objective.
Describe how you arrived at the final design
We created the Knee.J, a spoof sex toy of sorts that would be given away at the store for every customer that ran a bill above $150. The product was displayed and people were informed through posters and e-mailers.
Give some indication of how successful the outcome was in the market
There was an instant buzz generation through word-of-mouth and sales picked up by 40% in the first week itself. Customers were eager to lay their hands on the Knee.J. Funny pictures of customers posing with the product found its way to blogs and social networking sites. What was meant to be a one-store activity got enough publicity to manufacture more pieces and take them across all stores. Some even made it to the headquarters in Italy. Customers were left kneeling for more.