International Fund For Houbara Conservation Case study PRESERVING THE CULTURE AND HERITAGE OF THE UAE by Impact Porter Novelli Dubai

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PRESERVING THE CULTURE AND HERITAGE OF THE UAE

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Industry Public awareness
Media Case study
Market United Arab Emirates
Agency Impact Porter Novelli Dubai
Released January 2013

Awards

Dubai Lynx 2013
PR NON-CORPORATE BRONZE

Credits & Description

Client INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR HOUBARA CONSERVATION
Product CAPTIVE BREEDING AND RELEASE PROGRAMME TO CONSERVE THE HOUBARA BUSTARD
Entrant IMPACT PORTER NOVELLI Dubai, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Type of Entry: PR: Sectors and Services
Category: NON-CORPORATE
Title: PRESERVING THE CULTURE AND HERITAGE OF THE UAE
Product/Service: CAPTIVE BREEDING AND RELEASE PROGRAMME TO CONSERVE THE HOUBARA BUSTARD
PR Agency : IMPACT PORTER NOVELLI Dubai, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Entrant Company : IMPACT PORTER NOVELLI Dubai, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Name Company Position
Tracey Mclaine Impact Porter Novelli/Abu Dhabi Associate Director
Delphine Delire International Fund For Houbara Conservation Head Of Pr And Comms
Dr. Paul Lowe Adec Senior Science Curriculum Specialist
Dr. Fatheya Al Ahmadi Adec Senior Science Curriculum Specialist
Describe the campaign/entry:
The PR campaign was founded on changing the behaviour of future generations through raising awareness and educating a range of stakeholders on the importance of conserving the Houbara bird. IFHC runs a captive breeding and release programme to repopulate diminishing stocks as well as create awareness and change behaviour. Key to changing behaviour and awareness is education. - IFHC and ADEC worked together to define key objectives for a succcessful education programme - preserve culture and heritage, integrate the Houbara and IFHC into the national curriculum and inspire future generations to train for careers in ecology, genetics and science. By teaming up with ADEC, IFHC built a programme centred around inquiry learning and experiential education. Key education tools were developed - brochures, games, presentations - and provided to pilot schools at 2 different age groups, grade 5 and grade 9. Classes then used these to learn about the Houbara prior to visiting IFHC's captive breeding and release centre, NARC. During the visit, students were shown key parts of the facility from display pens to the live food area and the incubation areas. A movie was shown depicting each step of the ecology programme from artificial insemination to release of mature birds. Following the visit, children created presentations, books and plays about the Houbara and IFHC which they shared with their schools and parents. Originally the pilot programme encompassed 2 schools, in 2012/13 it grew to 12 schools and for 2014/15 there is currently interest from more than 40 schools.
Describe the brief from the client:
The overall goal was to go towards sustainable hunting; specifically regarding the Houbara bustard. The objectives of the campaign were: -Build an education programme bsed on conserving the Houbara and preserving the culture and heritage of the UAE -Link the Houbara bustard and IFHC's captive breeding programme to the national curriculum -Inspire future generations of UAE nationals to train for careers in ecology, genetics, biology and other sciences. Target audiences are children, teachers, UAE Nationals, falconers. Research was conducted with ADEC, RSPB, NAAWS,Al Ain Zoo, EPA, EAD. and many more global conservation societies that run successful education programmes.
Results:
From an initial pilot of 2 schools, the 2012/2013 IFHC school programme now encompasses 12 schools with plans to expand the programme to more schools and age groups in the coming years.The programme is the first of its kind in the Gulf region to incorporate 'inquiry learning' into national curriculum activities around a conservation programme. Its success has lead many students to understand the importance of conservation and the preservation of natural habitats and heritage. In addition, IFHC are hoping to expand their education programme significantly and are exploring the option of building a fully equipped education centre in NARC. This will create more jobs locally and also allow more children than ever to learn about IFHC, the Houbara and conservation. This programme also had a ripple effect internationally with Cheshunt School in Maryland, USA designing a web app based on conserving the Houbara.
Execution:
The initial meetings took place in June 2011 where research was discovered and ideas shared. Planning took off in January 2012 when the agency built strong relationships with ADEC; the school programme began to take shape. Sharing documents, information and creating content for the school visits took place in Q1 of 2012. This involved providing relevant information to ADEC regarding IFHC. ADEC created curriculum materials based on 'inquiry learning' that was shared with two schools. In Q2 the schools visited NARC and were able to ask knowledgable questions regarding IFHC and the captive breeding programme. The schools then presented their findings to peers, parents and the team. The presentations were correct and factual and as result, many schools are wait listed to join the programme. The method of learning used 'inquiry learning' is based on allowing children to use different ways to discover information and proved perfect for our programme.
The Situation:
The success of IFHC depends on raising awareness of the Houbara and the need to conserve it; then translating this awareness into tangible deliverables that people can act upon hence the need for an education programme. The overarching PR & Comms strategy is based on targeting key stakeholders - falconers, UAE nationals and eventually a wider international audience, with clear, concise messages across all communications. Building an education programme linked to the national curriculum in Abu Dhabi immediately communicates directly to children, teachers and parents, many of whom have falconers in their family, and effectively starts to change behaviour.
The Strategy:
We researched global and local programmes then facilitated education brainstorming meetings with a wide range of stakeholders, determining best practice and ways forward. Following this an initial plan was produced in collaboration with Abu Dhabi Education Council and IFHC. The initial programme was a pilot involving 2 schools. Working with ADEC, collateral and information was produced that allowed the schools to learn about the Houbara and IFHC ahead of a proposed visit to the National Avian Research Centre (NARC) in Sweihan where IFHC run its captive breeding and release programme. Following the visit, the schools would then produce their own presentations on the work of IFHC and the Houbara bustard taking the form of a book, play, PowerPoint or poster. This work would then be presented to their peers and parents were invited to attend the ceremonies. The schools also had the opportunity to display their work at ADIHEX.