New Museum Case study RECALLING 1993 by Droga5 New York

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RECALLING 1993

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Industry Museums & Libraries, Shows, Events & Festivals
Media Case study
Market United States
Agency Droga5 New York
Associate Creative Director Ray Del Savio, Jerry Hoak
Executive Creative Director Nik Studzinski, Ted Royer
Art Director Jen Lu, Daniel Sumarna
Copywriter Colin Lord
Producer Jennifer Mckenzie
Released May 2013

Awards

Cannes Lions 2013
Promo and Activation Lions Use of Promo & Activation; Best Use of Experiential Marketing in a Promotional Campaign Bronze

Credits & Description

Type of entry: Use of Promo & Activation
Category: Best Use of Experiential Marketing in a Promotional Campaign
Advertiser: NEW MUSEUM
Product/Service: “NYC 1993: EXPERIMENTAL JET SET, TRASH AND NO STAR” EXHIBITION
Agency: DROGA5 New York, USA

Creative Chairman: David Droga (Droga5)
Executive Creative Director: Ted Royer (Droga5)
Executive Creative Director: Nik Studzinski (Droga5)
Associate Creative Director: Ray Del Savio (Droga5)
Associate Creative Director: Jerry Hoak (Droga5)
Copywriter: Colin Lord (Droga5)
Bryan Wolff: Bryan Wolff (Droga5)
Art Director: Jen Lu (Droga5)
Art Director: Daniel Sumarna (Droga5)
Brand Strategist: Matthew Gardner (Droga5)
Head of Integrated Production: Sally Ann Dale (Droga5)
Executive Producer: Scott Chin (Droga5)
Executive Interactive Producer: Lindsey Slaby (Droga5)
Producer: Jennifer McKenzie (Droga5)
Production Assistant: Golddie Robbens (Droga5)
Technical Director: David Justus (Droga5)
Creative Technology Lead: Fran Devinney (Droga5)
UX Director: Kathrin Hoffman (Droga5)
UX Director: Eileen Tang (Droga5)
Associate Digital Producer: Ian Graetzer (Droga5)
Senior Print Producer: Jeannie O'Toole (Droga5)
Print Production Assistant: Annick Thomas (Droga5)
Strategy Intern: PJ Mongell (Droga5)
Researcher: Amelia Barry (Droga5)
Researcher: Sarah Gancher (Droga5)
Researcher: Bo Jacober (Droga5)
Group Account Director: Olivia Legere (Droga5)
Account Director: Caitlin Account Director (Droga5)
Account Manager: Louisa Cronan (Droga5)
Communication Director: Maura McGreevy (Droga5)
Associate Communication Managers: Carly Bennett (Droga5)

Describe the brief from the client
In the early 90s New York was a city in turmoil. And yet despite the drugs, gentrification and AIDS crisis, artists were creating some of the most influential work in the latter half of the century. The New Museum exhibition, NYC 1993: EXPERIMENTAL JET SET, TRASH AND NO STAR, relives that time by showcasing work created in New York in 1993. To promote the show, we created Recalling 1993 and brought the exhibit to every street corner in Manhattan using one of the last remaining relics of 1993: the pay phone.



Promotion Development


Recalling 1993 collected 100s of stories from famous, infamous and influential New Yorkers and turned 5,000 NYC pay phones into time machines by serving callers stories specific to their exact location. Each story gave New Yorkers a more rounded understanding of their city’s past, piquing interest in this time period and driving listeners to see the exhibit at the New Museum.




Results


Despite an overall budget of only $10,000, word of Recalling 1993 quickly spread to hundreds of news outlets all over the world, generating over 165 million earned impressions in just four weeks. As a result, attendance to the museum spiked dramatically in the week Recalling 1993 was launched, with a 31% increase in attendance compared to the previous year making it the single most successful promotion in the history of the New Museum. Executive Director of the New Museum, Lisa Phillips, had this to say about Recalling 1993, “In my 30 years of museum experience, I've never seen a campaign of this magnitude for an exhibition.”




Relevancy to Product/Service


The New Museum’s exhibition shows NYC art from 1993 that still has cultural and political relevance today. As an extension of that, Recalling 1993 uses pay phones as a medium for storytelling, contextualizing their respective Manhattan neighbourhoods. By cataloguing these cultural touchstones where they happened, we’re able to show people the progression of these stories that still echo today. This approach is especially fitting for the New Museum, an institution known for celebrating its historic neighbourhood, the Bowery.