WEEPING WORDS by Kinetic Singapore for Pave

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WEEPING WORDS

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Industry Against violence
Media Design & Branding
Market Singapore
Agency Kinetic Singapore
Copywriter Eugene Tan
Photographer John Nursalim
Typographer Lim Shue Pann, Gen Tan
Released November 2009

Credits & Description

Category: Posters
Advertiser: PAVE
Product/Service: ANTI-FAMILY VIOLENCE ORGANISATION
Agency: KINETIC SINGAPORE
Date of First Appearance: Dec 1 2009 12:00AM
Entrant Company: KINETIC SINGAPORE, SINGAPORE
Art Director: Gen Tan/Pann Lim (Kinetic Singapore)
Copywriter: Eugene Tan (Kinetic Singapore)
Typographer: Gen Tan/ Pann Lim (Kinetic Singapore)
Photographer: John Nursalim (Visualmind)
Media placement: School Posters / Community Club Posters / library posters - School / Community Club / Library - 1 Dec 2009

Describe the challenges and key objectives
The challenge was to rise above the ordinary where many charity organisations and support groups struggle to raise awareness about the dangers and suffering children bear at the hands of their transgressors.

Describe the brief from the client
The brief aims to depict and capture the vulnerability and suffering of children and transform it into truthful and emotive messages the world will read, listen and act upon.

Describe how you arrived at the final design
The campaign aimed to delve deeper into the issue of child abuse and show the innocence lost in victims. The flowing nature of the words speaks of tears shed and innocence lost in child abuse victims. The posters brought together and documented the sadness and the extent of cruelty exacted on child abuse victims through the stories told in each poster with a reminder to the reader, not to turn a blind eye to children who need help.

Give some indication of how successful the outcome was in the market
Posters were put up in schools, community clubs, public libraries and poor neighbourhoods. Similar leaflets were distributed by volunteers and social workers of PAVe during reach-out programmes in their visits to schools and poor neighbourhoods. There was a 18% increase in PAVe’s phone hotline and 15% increase in walk-ins, seeking help. Also, there was a 20% increase in the number of volunteers at PAVe.