The Injured Jockeys Fund Design & Branding THE INJURED JOCKEYS FUND - HELP by The Partners

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THE INJURED JOCKEYS FUND - HELP

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Industry Charities, Foundations, Volunteers
Media Design & Branding
Market United Kingdom
Agency The Partners
Creative Director Michael Paisley
Designer Leon Bahrani, James Titterton
Photographer Toby Edwards
Released October 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Posters
Advertiser: THE INJURED JOCKEYS FUND
Product/Service: THE INJURED JOCKEYS FUND
Agency: THE PARTNERS
Date of First Appearance: Oct 20 2010
Entrant Company: THE PARTNERS, London, UNITED KINGDOM
Creative Partner: Greg Quinton (The Partners)
Creative Director: Michael Paisley (The Partners)
Designer: Leon Bahrani (The Partners)
Designer: James Titterton (The Partners)
Photographer: Toby Edwards
Costume Designer: Lisa Menzel
Costume Designer: Alice Speak
Media placement: Support boards (x3) - for awards - -
Media placement: Posters- HELP (x4) - Horse racing events and meets - October 2010

Describe the brief from the client
The Injured Jockeys Fund helps jockeys who are forced out of competition for long periods or must end their racing career early as a result of sustaining serious injury. Since 1964, the charity has provided financial, medical and pastoral help to amateur and professional jockeys. Traditionally supported by the racing establishment and celebrities within the sport, the charity wanted to raise its profile amongst younger race-goers.

Describe the challenges and key objectives
The challenge here was to highlight the work of the Injured Jockeys Fund to a younger audience, whilst also encouraging people to donate to the cause.

Describe how you arrived at the final design
Whilst looking at regulation UK racing silk patterns, we found that by cropping into them using A-size dimensions we could create letterforms. We created a new unique typeface of 26 letters, each of which was turned into an individual poster, which can be used to spell out appropriate words when displayed in sequence.

The new typeface gives the charity a clear, distinct voice and allows them to promote their cause to race-goers in a refreshingly bold and colourful way.

Give some indication of how successful the outcome was in the market
The first example of the new typeface in use is a series of 4 posters displayed at race meetings around the UK. When arranged together, they simply read ‘HELP’ – both identifying the charity as a source of assistance for injured jockeys as well as subtly appealing for support and donations. The posters offered greater visual cut-through on busy race-days, garnering many positive comments and increased donations.