Bristol-Myers Squibb DM MELANOMA EXPOSED by Ogilvy & Mather New York

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MELANOMA EXPOSED

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Industry Health & Pharmaceutical Products
Media Direct marketing
Market United States
Agency Ogilvy & Mather New York
Creative Director Jeff Bratteson
Account Supervisor Jennifer Seelin, Melanie Brunner
Released October 2012

Credits & Description

Advertiser: BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB
Agency: OGILVY NEW YORK
Category: Websites, Microsites & Banners
Advertising campaign: MELANOMA EXPOSED
Senior Project Manager: Annette Cerbone (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Chief Digital Officer: Dan Chichester (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Account Supervisor: Jennifer Seelin (Ogilvy PR)
Account Supervisor: Melanie Brunner (Ogilvy PR)
VP/Associate Director Of Technology: Nelson Figueiredo (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Writer: Jim Nolan (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Chief Creative Officer: Jonathan Isaacs (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
SVP/Director Of Technology: Matt Balogh (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Associate Director/Technology Management: Michael Paige (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
EVP/Healthcare: Sally Barton (Ogilvy PR)
Strategy: Scott Friedberg (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Associate Lead Digital Developer: Carmine Jichetti (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
SVP/Healthcare Practices: Cindy Oertel (Ogilvy PR)
Digital Project Management: Erick Einhorn (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Senior Art Director: Grace Cho (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Creative Director: Jeff Bratteson (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Associate Director/Technology Management: Jordan Saletan (Ogilvy Commonhealth)
Vice President: Kate Fisher (Ogilvy PR)

Implementation
At-risk men pay almost no attention to skin health, but are active online when it comes to sports information. So Melanoma Exposed leveraged a strong NFL partnership to capture attention. The website’s “Coach’s Challenge” engaged men with interactive melanoma education and guides to local screenings. With the “Forward Pass” tool men alerted Facebook friends about melanoma risk in home states. With the “Goalpost Avenue” game (online and app) men kicked field goals in their neighborhoods via Google Street View. As the game escalated, men leveled up their melanoma understanding, with a design of driving specific actions: screen, protect, know, tell.

Outcome
Knowledge of melanoma nearly doubled from 28% in 2011 to 55% in 2012. 81% of respondents reported being more knowledgable about melanoma. 20,000 were “edutained” playing Goalpost Avenue. After the first 8 screening events, nearly 2,000 people were screened — over half had never had a screening before. 74% said they would go to a doctor for a screening. 86% would recommend screenings to friends. 500 potential cancers were identified. 26 were unconfirmed melanoma, 1.4% of the screened population — over-indexing against the national average of .02% incidence. And lives were almost certainly saved.

Execution
Research showed that men would connect with a melanoma awareness campaign *if* channeled through sports. Online presence of the target of +45 men is high, with over 22 million of them “social gamers.” The website was hosted by a Superbowl-winning coach, whose wife died from melanoma. Google Street View turns a visitor’s neighborhood into the backdrop, "localizing" that gives context to interactive disease education. This is also in the game, with bonus “edutainment” q&a to boost the challenge. All together, elevated understanding, encouraged screening and promoted sharing equal BMS’s mission to help patients prevail over serious diseases.

Client Brief Or Objective
Melanoma kills one American every hour, with men twice as likely to die from this deadly form of cancer. It was urgent for men to become active about getting screened. To achieve this important objective, Melanoma Exposed set its goals to:-Elevate melanoma’s profile: Strategic activities to highlight melanoma as one of most aggressive cancers once it spreads — but very treatable when caught early. -Impact public behavior: Encourage high-risk men to take an active role in their skin health by getting screened.-Drive early detection of melanoma: Offer free skin cancer screenings at key events throughout the U.S.