TINY-T by Zulu Alpha Kilo for National Eating Disorders Association

TINY-T

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Industry Charities, Foundations, Volunteers, Public Safety, Health & Hygiene
Media Direct marketing
Market Canada
Agency Zulu Alpha Kilo
Creative Director Zak Mroueh
Copywriter Troy Mcclure
Designer Marketa Krivy, Grant Cleland
Print Production Manager Eileen Smith
Released January 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Charities, Public Health & Safety, Public Awareness Messages
Advertiser: NATIONAL EATING DISORDER INFORMATION CENTRE
Product/Service: EATING DISORDER AWARENESS
Agency: ZULU ALPHA KILO
Date of First Appearance: Feb 1 2010 12:00AM
Entrant Company: ZULU ALPHA KILO, Toronto, CANADA
Creative Director: Zak Mroueh (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Art Director: Marketa Krivy (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Copywriter: Troy McClure (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Account Executive: Sandra Stinchcombe (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Designer: Grant Cleland (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Print Production Manager: Eileen Smith (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Production Artist: Mike Thoag (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Client: Merryl Bear (National Eating Disorder Information Centre)
Designer: Marketa Krivy (Zulu Alpha Kilo)
Media placement: Direct Mail - Direct Mail - February 1, 2010

Describe the brief/objective of the direct campaign.
Research has shown that even brief exposure to images of ultra thin models negatively affects body image in girls and women that can lead to eating disorders. Our objective was to bring awareness to this problem among its key perpetrators – fashion leaders and marketers – in such a way that made them think before they cast, and ultimately broaden their definition of beauty.

Explain why the creative execution was relevant to the product or service.
The ad was entirely relevant to both fashion leaders and marketers precisely because it wasn't an ad but an article of clothing – one that forced the target to put themselves in the average woman's shoes or indeed bodies.

Describe the creative solution to the brief/objective with reference to the projected response rates and desired outcome.
Our solution was to send those guilty of casting ultra-thin models an impossibly tiny T-shirt with the instructions: 'Please try this on to experience how your ads make us feel'. It was a lighthearted yet poignant reminder to cast responsibly so as to stem the rise of eating disorders and body hatred among girls and women. We provided them with a URL where they could learn more and sign an actual pledge to cast responsibly and retouch minimally.

Describe the results in as much detail as possible with particular reference to the RESPONSE of the target audience including deliverability statistics, response rates, click throughs, sales cost per response, relationships built and overall return on investment.
The t-shirt garnered national and international media coverage from as far away as the UK and Japan including a front page article in a national newspaper. It sparked thousands of conversations online about the need for a change. Traffic to NEDIC’s website rose 250% following the launch of the campaign. The T-shirt showed up on numerous marketing and fashion blogs, and it was described by the editor of one of Canada’ leading fashion magazines as ‘brilliant’.