BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION: WATCH YOUR OWN HEART ATTACK by Grey London for British Heart Foundation/ BHF

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BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION: WATCH YOUR OWN HEART ATTACK

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Industry Public Safety, Health & Hygiene
Media Outdoor, Billboard, Poster, Transportation & Vehicles, Ambient, Digital, Interactive & Mobile, Case study
Market United Kingdom
Agency Grey London
Released June 2009

Awards

Cannes Lions 2009
Media - Silver

Credits & Description

Type of Entry: Use of Mixed Media
Category: Use of Mixed Media
Title: WATCH YOUR OWN HEART ATTACK
Advertiser/Client: BRITISH HEART FOUNDATION
Product/Service: HEART & CIRCULATORY DISEASE CHARITY
Entrant Company: GREY London, UNITED KINGDOM
Advertising Agency: GREY London, UNITED KINGDOM
Media Agency: PHD MEDIA London, UNITED KINGDOM
Creative Credits
Name Company Position
Jon Williams Grey London Chief Creative Officer
Damon Troth Grey London Creatives
Joanna Perry Grey London Creatives
Neil Hourston Grey London Chief Strategy Officer
Peter Zezulka Grey London Planner
Rhona Cairns Grey London Account Director
Zoe Farquhar Grey London Account Manager
Rebecca Pople Grey London Producer
Andrew Blackburn Grey London Producer
Juliet Naylor RSA Producer
Brett Foraker RSA Director
Adam Rudd Final Cut Editor
Rich Martin Envy Sound
Mark Cakebread Grey London Typographer
Colin Etherington Grey London Project Manager
Daniel Savidge Grey London Project Manager
Jill Young Grey London Art Buyer
Sean Meikle PHD Media Planner
Details
Results and Effectiveness:
The event was watched by more than six million people - higher ratings than the show it was placed in. There was a 24% increase in concern and more people now phone 999 immediately, if they suspect a heart attack. There was an increased awareness of symptoms. 62% of people who saw the campaign said they would find out more information, while 64% said they discussed/shared parts of the campaign with loved ones. The best endorsement is BHF who have received personal letters of thanks from individuals citing this campaign as having saved their life or a life of loved ones.
Creative Execution:
A phased approach of media channels was employed: - National press weekend supplements, TV listings and outdoor and ambient media invited the public to “Watch Your Own Heart Attack”, billed as “the most important two minutes of TV you’ll ever see”. - Personalities such as Chris Tarrant and David Cameron stating “I’ll be watching” in 10 second advertisements appeared on TV, radio, online, roaming ad vans, and via ITV’s interactive red button service. - Heavyweight PR generated significant national and regional coverage. - 2minutes.org.uk hosted 10-second teasers featuring well known personalities and offered mobile or email reminders of the broadcast pre-event. -Following the broadcast, the TV event was available for red button viewing for two weeks, at 2minutes.org.uk and via YouTube. -Online, press and ambient advertisements were also used to encourage those who had seen the event to share it with their loved ones.
Insights, Strategy and the Idea:
One in three heart attack victims die before they reach hospital, mostly because they don't recognize the symptons and delay seeking medical assistance. The single best way for people to recognise heart attack symptoms is to experience them for themselves. This campaign allowed people to experience their very own heart attack in the safety of their living rooms, so they were better prepared if it happened for real. The solution was the TV event ‘Watch Your Own Heart Attack’. This two-minute film, shot from the viewer’s perspective, saw Steven Berkoff vividly make the viewer suffer the common symptoms of a heart attack. Screened only once, and uniquely solus in break, at 9.17pm on Sunday August 10th, this was appointment to view television backed by an integrated campaign to create national anticipation. 6 million tuned in to have their own heart attack. Viewing figures actually went up in the break.