DESIGN FEVER! by Dentsu Inc. Tokyo for D&d

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DESIGN FEVER!

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Industry Shows, Events & Festivals
Media Print, Magazine & Newspaper
Market Japan
Agency Dentsu Inc. Tokyo
Creative Director Yuya Furukawa
Art Director Yoshihiro Yagi
Copywriter Haruko Tsutsui
Designer Takuya Iimura, Minami Otsuka
Producer Yoshiko Tomita, Shunpei Mikami
Photographer Honoka Sueyoshi
Released June 2012

Awards

Cannes Lions 2012
Design Lions Posters Bronze

Credits & Description

Category: Posters
Advertiser: THE YOSHIDA HIDEO MEMORIAL FOUNDATION / ADVERTISING MUSEUM TOKYO
Product/Service: D&AD 2011 EXHIBITION IN JAPAN
Agency: DENTSU
Creative Director: Yuya Furukawa (Dentsu)
Copywriter: Haruko Tsutsui (Dentsu)
Art Director: Yoshihiro Yagi (Dentsu)
Designer: Minami Otsuka (Taki Corporation)
Designer: Takuya Iimura (Taki Corporation)
Producer: Shunpei Mikami (Taki Corporation)
Printing Producer: Shinya Tamura (Dentsu On Demand Graphic)
Photographer: Honoka Sueyoshi (Feelance)
Producer: Yoshiko Tomita (Dentsu)
Media placement: B1×4 Poster - Station And Around The Venue - October 13,2011

Describe the brief from the client
We designed an exhibition space showcasing the D&AD Award, the highest honour of the design industry.

Describe the challenges and key objectives

Targets were Japanese professionals involved in design. Our aim was to create a sharp design that was strong yet simple.

Describe how you arrived at the final design
The motif came from Pachinko (Japanese pinball). Only ideas that go beyond uncontrollable variables, such as luck or innate talent, can win. This embodies the miracle of ‘Design Fever’. 4 posters types were created; themes included outer space and more anime. The entrance featured a remix of pachinko parlour sounds and sparkling posters.

Give some indication of how successful the outcome was in the market
The number of visitors doubled compared to last year. Posters were sold out. Many people decided to drop in after seeing the entrance. The event was also popular among foreign tourists, which helped attract new visitors.