TWEETBULLETS by Ogilvy & Mather Mexico for MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA

TWEETBULLETS

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Industry Museums & Libraries
Media Print, Magazine & Newspaper
Market Mexico
Agency Ogilvy & Mather Mexico
Creative Director Carlos Holcombe, Iván González
Art Director Marco Antonio Quevedo, Orlando García, Juan Carlos De Torno, Ana Méndez
Copywriter Manuel Vega, Ana Paola Noriega
Released June 2012

Awards

Cannes Lions 2012
Promo and Activation Lions Public Health & Safety, Pubic Awareness Messages Bronze

Credits & Description

Type of entry: Product & Service
Category: Public Health & Safety, Pubic Awareness Messages
Advertiser: MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Product/Service: MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Agency: OGILVY MEXICO Mexico City, MEXICO
Advertiser MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Product MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Entrant OGILVY MEXICO Mexico City, MEXICO
Type of Entry: Product & Service
Category: Public Health & Safety, Pubic Awareness Messages
Title: TWEETBULLETS
Advertiser/Client: MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Product/Service: MUSEO DE MEMORIA Y TOLERANCIA
Entrant Company: OGILVY MEXICO Mexico City, MEXICO
DM/Advertising Agency: OGILVY MEXICO Mexico City, MEXICO

Creative Vice President: José Montalvo (Ogilvy México)
Creative Vice President: Miguel Ángel Ruiz (Ogilvy México)
Creative Director: Manuel Vega (Ogilvy México)
Creative Director: Carlos Holcombe (Ogilvy México)
Creative Director: Iván González (Ogilvy México)
Copywriter: Ana Paola Noriega (Ogilvy México)
Copywriter: Manuel Vega (Ogilvy México)
Art Director: Juan Carlos de Torno (Ogilvy México)
Art Director: Marco Antonio Quevedo (Ogilvy México)
Art Director: Orlando García (Ogilvy Mexico)
Art Director: Ana Méndez (Ogilvy Mexico)
Agency Producer: Magalí Fernandez (Ogilvy Mexico)
Planning: Javier Macías (Ogilvy Mexico)
Planning: María José del Conde (Ogilvy Mexico)
Planning: Carolina Torres (Ogilvy Mexico)
Programming: Adrián Pérez (Ogilvy Mexico)
Motion: Rafael Carballo (Ogilvy Mexico)
Account Manager: Paola Mayoral (Ogilvy Mexico)
Mechatronics Engineer: Yair Bautista (Ogilvy Mexico)

Describe the brief from the client
The objective of the Museum of Memory and Tolerance (MMYT) is to promote all types of tolerance in our society and make people remember how discrimination has affected our world. But the truth is, Mexicans don’t really care that much about history and don’t feel identified with the Jewish Holocaust, Africa, etc. We needed to make them feel identified with this, bring awareness of discrimination to the modern era and use social networks to viralise the message.




Describe the creative solution to the brief/objective.



Slangs in Mexico have a lot of discriminating words, and this was showing in Twitter, badly. Thousands of discriminatory tweets (#forevercleaninglady, #queer, #smelllikeanindian, to name a few) were turning into trending topics and nobody was talking or thinking about it. So, in order to expose this and make people think about this growing problem, we built an installation for the Museum.

It was connected to Twitter, and for every 20 tweets with a discriminatory hashtag, a red paintball was shot against the word 'Mexico'. And on www.tweetbullets.com, people could see the installation in real-time and
see the degrading tweets.




Describe the results in as much detail as possible.



Discrimination in social networks was put to national debate. Only 24 hours after the launch, the hashtag #tweetbullets, had been mentioned more than 2,000 times in Twitter, reaching more than 11m users. 5 days later, 286 bullets were shot to Mexico (which meant around 6,000 discriminatory tweets), people started to point out discriminatory tweets and the most important media in the country and human rights leaders covered and talked about this important topic. Up to today, some of the measurable results are:

Page views: 111,883
Avg. time on page: 5:18 mins.
Discriminatory hashtags: 18,376
#tweetbalas tweets: 5,468




The objective of the Museum of Memory and Tolerance (MMYT) is to promote all types of tolerance in our society and make people remember how discrimination has affected our world. But the truth is, Mexicans don’t really care that much about history and don’t feel identified with the Jewish Holocaust, Africa, etc. We needed to make them feel identified with this, bring awareness of discrimination to the modern era and use social networks to viralise the message.