DRINK DRIVE ILLUSION by DDB Singapore for SINGAPORE ROAD SAFETY COUNCIL & SINGAPORE TRAFFIC POLICE

DRINK DRIVE ILLUSION

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Industry Traffic safety, Against alcohol
Media Print, Magazine & Newspaper
Market Singapore
Agency DDB Singapore
Creative Director Thomas Yang
Art Director Khoo Meng Hau, Kenny Foong
Copywriter Adrian Yeap
Photographer Lee Chee Kean, Allan Ng
Editor Yuan Jia
Released April 2012

Credits & Description

Category: Public Health & Safety, Pubic Awareness Messages
Advertiser: SINGAPORE ROAD SAFETY COUNCIL
Product/Service: ANTI-DRINK DRIVING
Agency: DDB GROUP SINGAPORE
Chief Creative Officer: Neil Johnson (DDB Group Singapore)
Group Executive Creative Director: Joji Jacob (DDB Group Singapore)
Creative Director: Thomas Yang (DDB Group Singapore)
Copywriter: Adrian Yeap (DDB Group Singapore)
Art Director: Khoo Meng Hau (DDB Group Singapore)
Art Director: Kenny Foong (DDB Group Singapore)
Account Management: Anthony Wan (DDB Group Singapore)
Account Management: Sim Yun Ying (DDB Group Singapore)
Editor: Yuan Jia (DDB Group Singapore)
Photographer: Allan Ng (The Republic)
Photographer: Chee Kean Lee (DDB Group Singapore)
Digital Imaging: Rainer (Digtalis)
Production/Mockups: Profoto Digital Services (Profoto Digital Services)
Locations Provider: St James Holding (St James Holding)
Media placement: Special Build Ambient - Restroom - 13 April 2012

Describe the objective of the promotion.
Of the 4,055 people arrested for drink-driving last year, 93% were men. More tellingly, all but one of the 235 drink-driving accidents that resulted involved male drivers. Studies also show that too much alcohol can impair a driver’s judgement by distorting his perception of what’s near and far. Hence, we were tasked to communicate the physiological effect of drinking to men who wrongly believe that despite the alcohol, they are in full control of their bodies.

Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation.
To illustrate this optical impairment, we employed an optical illusion at a place where we could have the complete attention of men – the restrooms of pubs and clubs. When viewed straight on, the poster shows a car in the distance. However when seen from the side, the car now protrudes out towards the viewer – clearly demonstrating how alcohol can severely affect your judgement.

Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product or service.
The illusion bent the laws of depth perception to recreate the experience one would have when intoxicated. It held the attention of men for as long as they went about their ‘business’ in the restroom. Thus by directly engaging the male audience face-on, we got them to look twice and consequently, think twice before drink driving.

Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results.
After the posters were put up, valet services at these pubs and clubs went up by an average of 30%, meaning men were no longer under the illusion that they could drive home safely if they drank.