Amnesty International Promo, Case study FREEDOM DICTIONARY by TORKE+CC

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FREEDOM DICTIONARY

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Industry Charities, Foundations, Volunteers, Human Rights
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Portugal
Agency TORKE+CC
Creative Director Frederico Roberto, Nuno Mendes
Art Director José Sobral, Rui Pica
Copywriter Bob Ferraz
Released February 2012

Credits & Description

Category: Charity and Not for Profit
Advertiser: AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PORTUGAL
Product/Service: AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Agency: TORKE
Chief Creative Officer: André Rabanea (Torke)
Creative Director: Frederico Roberto (Torke)
Creative Supervisor: Bob Ferraz (Torke)
Copywriter: Bob Ferraz (Torke)
Art Director: Rui Pica (Torke)
Art Assistant: Joana Mateus (Torke)
Project Manager: Frederico Ferreira (Torke)
Film Editor: Tiago Soares (Torke)
Project Manager: Pedro Patrício (Wiz Interactive)
Creative Director: Nuno Mendes (Wiz Interactive)
Art Director: José Sobral (Wiz Interactive)
Developer: Luís Dias (Wiz Interactive)
Film Editor: Pedro Miguel Santos (Wiz Interactive)
Media placement: Social PR - Amnesty International Portugal website - 11th February 2012

Summary of the Campaign
To mark a Global Day of Action on Revolutions in Middle East and North Africa, Amnesty International Portugal is giving these protesters a voice, setting their words free and amplifying their message through social media. The Freedom Dictionary project is a collective dictionary that holds 155,000 words. These words will be set free by people, through the internet. To take part in this project, just go to www.freedomdictionary.org, choose a word and share using social media networks. On World Press Freedom Day, 11 copies of the dictionary will be printed and mailed to 11 countries where revolutions are taking place.

The Situation
To ensure that everyone could have a social conscience on what's happening in Northern Africa and the Middle East, Amnesty International Portugal empowered everybody with the unique feature of giving voices to those in need. We knew that the dictionary was not to be completed, but that's the power of the message too, since the problem doesn't end there. With 155,000 words to be released, we expected a response rate of roughly 20% (31,000 words). It's a PR campaign, mainly because Freedom of Speech is at stake, so every media should be aware of this situation.

The Goal
Since the brand itself and the requested briefing are related to social causes themselves, the goal was clearly to reach out mass society, with social networks, and by doing so, and expecting heavy participation, to catch national and international media attention. PR speaking, it’s very simple: one thing is to have 400 people participating in a cause. The other is to have 50.000. It’s newsworthy.

The Strategy
Facebook had a key role in this campaign since users had to log in via this social network and share their unique freed word, linked to him/her, forever. The website went live on the first anniversary of Northern Africa and Middle Eastern revolutions and ended on the World Press Freedom Day.

Execution
Since the brand itself and the requested briefing are related to social causes themselves, the goal was clearly to reach out mass society, with social networks, and by doing so, and expecting heavy participation, to catch national and international media attention. PR speaking, it’s very simple: one thing is to have 400 people participating in a cause. The other is to have 50.000. It’s newsworthy.
To do so, people had to log on, on the website, through facebook connect and share their freed word on that network. People could only release one single word, from within a previously built online dictionary with hidden words, making it very symbolical and powerful. Last week, 11 copies of the dictionary were actually printed and delivered in the 11 embassies of the countries where revolutions are still taking place. The words that were’nt released featured in the Dictionary, with a blank space.

Documented Results
With 155.000 words to be released we expected a response rate of roughly 20% (31,000 words). The website got 55,000 words released and 100,000 shares on facebook. A subjective, altough powerful goal was also achieved: Richard Falk, UN Rapporteur for Human Rights in the Middle East, praised the initiative in a video testimonial.