Exit-deutschland Promo, Case study TROJAN SHIRT by Grabarz & Partner Hamburg

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TROJAN SHIRT

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Industry Public Safety, Health & Hygiene
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Germany
Agency Grabarz & Partner Hamburg
Creative Director Ralf Nolting, Ralf Heuel
Copywriter Anna Wilhelmi, Christian Moehler
Account Supervisor Ina Bach
Released August 2011

Credits & Description

Category: Charity and Not for Profit
Advertiser: EXIT DEUTSCHLAND
Product/Service: RIGHT-WING EXTREMISM AWARENESS
Agency: GRABARZ & PARTNER
Executive Creative Director: Ralf Heuel (Grabarz & Partner)
Creative Director: Ralf Heuel (Grabarz & Partner)
Art Direction: Sebastian Kuehn (Grabarz & Partner)
Copywriter: Anna Wilhelmi (Grabarz & Partner)
Copywriter: Christian Moehler (Grabarz & Partner)
Idea/Concept: Philipp Schwartz (Grabarz & Partner)
Idea/Concept: Sebastian Kuehn (Grabarz & Partner)
Idea: Alexander Milde (Grabarz & Partner)
Concept/Account Supervisor: Nils Rüsenberg (Grabarz & Partner)
Account Supervisor: Ina Bach (Grabarz & Partner)
Production: Karlotta Ahrens (Grabarz & Partner)
Print: (Cheap Tricks)
Advertisers Supervisor: Bernd Wagner (Exit Germany)
Advertisers Supervisor: Fabian Wichmann (Exit Germany)
Media placement: Promotion - Promotion During The Rechtsrock Fesival - 06.08.2011

Summary of the Campaign
EXIT-Deutschland is a small initiative that helps right-wingers who want to drop out of the scene by giving them new opportunities for an ‘afterlife’. The initiative relies on private donations and has to regularly prove its relevance.

Challenge: Finding new occasions to spread its name and engage in discourse with neo-Nazis and the public.

To get the EXIT message across, we developed 250 T-shirts bearing the rightist slogan: ‘Hardcore rebels. National and free.’ We used an assumed identity to supply them to the organisers of Europe’s biggest right-wing rock festival, who then distributed the shirts among festival-goers.

But a surprise awaited the rightists back home. The Trojan idea: we had primed the shirts with a print that washed off. After the first wash, they said: ‘If your T-shirt can do it, so can you. We can help you to get free of right-wing extremism. EXIT-Deutschland.’

The ‘Trojan shirt’ coup was a great success. The message spread rapidly across the scene. And media from all over the world reported on EXIT and the ‘Trojan shirts’. And not only did the number of donations and Facebook fans greatly increase, but also, and most importantly, the number of rightists who requested consultancy tripled.

The Situation
EXIT-Deutschland helps right-wing extremists to get out of the scene. Right-wing extremism is still a major problem in Germany. An increasing number of young people is likely drawn to the neo-Nazi scene. That makes it more important than ever for EXIT’s impact to grow.

As EXIT is semi-public, the organisation’s survival depends on money from funding bodies and private donations for which it has to get the public’s awareness and regularly prove its relevance.

The Goal
Primarily: To make EXIT-Deutschland’s offer known to neo-Nazis and grab the publics attention and thus prove the organisation’s relevance.

Secondarily: To reach especially younger Neo-Nazis in the right setting – in a solitary, quiet moment, in which potential dropouts have the chance to think about the offer without the pressure of the external group.

The Strategy
To make EXIT-Deutschland’s offer known to neo-Nazis, it was crucial to find a way to sneak into the scene and let their group cohesion work for EXIT through word of mouth.

With a Trojan marketing strategy and the brand-new product idea of a washable ‘Trojan shirt’, we were sure that we would catch the neo-Nazis’ attention and that the message would spread within and outside the scene.

To ensure we got the public’s attention, we chose Europe’s biggest right-wing rock music festival as the place of action, being sure that the media would report on it. Moreover, a music festival would ensure we reached younger members of the scene, whose right-wing attitude may not yet be set in stone.

Execution
We produced 250 T-shirts for EXIT bearing a typical rightist slogan. We used an assumed identity to supply them to the organiser of Europe’s biggest right-wing rock festival, who then distributed the shirts among festival-goers. But the T-shirts had been primed with a print that washed off. After just one wash, they said: ‘If your T-shirt can do it, so can you. We can help you to get free of right-wing extremism. EXIT-Deutschland.’

Documented Results
The message spread rapidly across the scene, and media from all over the world reported extensively on EXIT and the ‘Trojan shirts’.

Channel Two of Germany’s television broadcasting claimed the ‘Trojan shirts’ to be the top social media hit in 2011.

The media equivalence value of German TV, radio and print media was 50 times higher than the costs spent on the initiative.

People from all over the world wanted to know more about EXIT-Deutschland. In the week of the initiative, there was an increase of 167,000% in single visitors on its home page.

Compared to the same month one year before, EXIT-Deutschland received an increase of 434% donations in the month after the Trojan coup.

But most importantly, with the Trojan coup we increased the EXIT consultancy rate among neo-Nazis threefold.