MAO-GLASSES for FORUM FOR LEVANDE HISTORIA

MAO-GLASSES

Pin to Collection
Add a note
Industry Shows, Events & Festivals
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Released July 2012

Credits & Description

Category: Best Use of Social Media
Advertiser: FORUM FÖR LEVANDE HISTORIA
Product/Service: EXHIBITION
Creative Director: Joakim Karlsson (JMW Kommunikation)
Account Director: Björn Mellstrand (JMW Kommunikation)
Communication Strategist: Hampus Brynolf (Forum för Levande Historia)
Director: Robinovich (Palladium)
Director: Filip Hammarström (Palladium)
Digital PR strategist: Kristofer Mencak (JMW Kommunikation)
Producer: Henrik Jakobsson (Palladium)
Editor: Lars Gustafson (Palladium)
Director Of Photography/Lighting/Cameraman: John Strandh (Palladium)
Sound design/Music: Björn Baummann (Palladium)
Post production: Robert Eskekärr (Palladium)
Media placement: Letter Of Invitation ("real" Mao-Glasses) - Svenska Dagbladet (leading morning paper) editorial blog - 3 September 2009
Media placement: Youtube video - 54 pieces of print coverage (ie Aftonbladet, Dagens Nyheter and Expressen) - 3 September 2009
Media placement: Youtube video (cont.) - 6 pieces of broadcast coverage (ie Gomorron Sverige, Kulturnyheterna, Agenda) - 3 September 2009
Media placement: Email with link to a number of political bloggers - 115 blog posts (ie Newsmill) - 4 September 2009

Summary of the Campaign
Challenge: Forum for Levande Historia (The Forum for Living History) required a campaign to raise awareness for their upcoming exhibition “Dinner with Pol Pot”. The theme of the exhibition was something as distant and uninspiring as a Swedish delegation’s visit to Pol Pot’s Cambodia 30 years ago, and our client was relatively unknown. Objectives: We wanted to spark a debate about the “blindness” of the Swedish delegation. This debate would hopefully raise awareness and interest, and get people to visit the exhibition. Strategy and execution: In a provocative TV Shop-inspired film we suggested that the Swedish delegation, headed by the famous leftist-debater Jan Myrdal, must have been wearing desirable ”Mao Glasses”. Glasses that make all the horrors look like a beautiful, revolutionary utopia. We put the film on YouTube and sent an invitation to the main liberal newspaper in Sweden. Outcome: The film sparked a massive national debate, reaching the leading editorial pages and morning shows. It has so far been viewed 27,724 times on YouTube and featured in over 50 articles in newspapers and television. The debate continues, in online and offline media. And the exhibition has recorded more visitors than any other exhibition in the authority’s history.

The Goal
The goal of the campaign was to drive visitors to the exhibition, but also to raise awareness of this partly forgotten taint in Sweden’s history and to inspire discussion and reflection. The target audience were primarily politically- and socially-engaged young people, and secondly the general public. With a communication budget of €20 000 we realized we had to create something that would spark a debate in earned media. And would be interesting enough to travel through online social media.

Results
The film sparked a massive national debate, reaching all the way to the leading editorial pages and main television morning shows. It has so far been viewed 27,724 times on YouTube, embedded in a number of the major newspapers own video feeds, and featured in over 50 articles in newspapers and television. The debate continues, in online and offline media. And the exhibition has recorded more visitors than any other exhibition in the authority’s history.

Execution
We produced a TV Shop-inspired film, which suggested that the Swedish delegation, headed by the famous leftist-politician Jan Myrdal, must have been wearing ”Mao-Glasses”. Glasses that made all the horrors look like a beautiful, revolutionary utopian vision. Glasses that now can be bought fairly cheaply (to reflect how easily it is for some people to be swayed by ideologies or group pressure). The film was uploaded onto YouTube on the 3rd of September and a pair of real Mao-glasses with the YouTube link was sent to Svenska Dagbladet (one of the main Swedish newspapers). The day after a number of key bloggers were addressed to catalyse the movement. After that, the film was left to live a life of its own. All according to plan.

The Situation
The Forum for Living History is an authority with the mission to spread knowledge and information about crimes against humanity. In autumn 2009 the authority arranged an exhibition about the 1978 Swedish left-wing delegation, which travelled to Kampuchea to inspect the Khmer Rouge revolution. The delegation returned to Sweden and credited Pol Pot for managing to build a democratic and classless society. During this same revolution 1,7 million people were murdered. We faced the challenge of creating interest in an exhibition about an event very distant, both in time and place, with a communication budget of just below €20 000.

The Strategy
Since we wanted to initiate a debate, we decided to create a piece of material that would provoke people on both political sides – and put it on the Internet. Communist movements during the seventies heavily influenced politically engaged Swedes, and many considered the Khmer Rouge revolution a utopian example of anti-imperialism. Among quite a few Swedes, these beliefs still exist. One of them is the former leader of the delegation, the famous Swedish leftist-debater Jan Myrdal, disliked by many people for his radical viewpoints - not least among liberals, though he remains admired by his followers. We chose to produce a film that made fun of the naivety of the Swedish delegation, and especially Jan Myrdal; and by launching the campaign though a liberal morning paper, we counted on a quick and substantial reaction.