Forum Nucleair Promo, Case study CLEAR ABOUT NUCLEAR by Akkanto, Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels

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CLEAR ABOUT NUCLEAR

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Industry Business equipment & services, Corporate Image
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Belgium
Agency Akkanto
Agency Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels
Creative Director Jan Teulingkx
Art Director Alexander Cha'ban, Vanessa Hendrickx
Copywriter Frederik Clarysse, Damien Veys
Released November 2011

Credits & Description

Category: Technology and Manufacturing
Advertiser: NUCLEAIR FORUM
Product/Service: INFORMATION AND DEBATE CENTER
Agency: SAATCHI & SAATCHI BRUSSELS
Agency: AKKANTO
Creative Director: Alexander Cha'ban (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Creative Director: Jan Teulingkx (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Art Director: Vanessa Hendrickx (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Art Director: Alexander Cha'ban (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Copywriter: Damien Veys (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Copywriter: Frederik Clarysse (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Account Manager: Nicolas Pignatelli (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Account Manager: Zoë Cooreman (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
: Wout Van Gorp (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Graphic Designer: James Kruger (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Graphic Designer: Davy Dooms (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Strategic Director: Yves Van Landeghem (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Art Buyer: Gaëlle Haesaert (Saatchi & Saatchi Brussels)
Media placement: Internal Communication - TBC - 26 November 2011
Media placement: Corporate Communication - TBC - 26 November 2011
Media placement: Event - TBC - 26 November 2011
Media placement: Public Affairs - TBC - 26 November 2011

Summary of the Campaign
Years of non-communication from the nuclear sector has left the whole field wide open for the, often very well organised and vocal, opposers. And even though research shows that a lot of people don’t actually have an opinion on the subject, the absence of those who work in the sector leads to a one sided, and often very stereotypical debate. To attack nuclear energy and applications, the mere mention of ‘Tsjernobyl’, ‘Nagasaki’ and now ‘Fukushima’ largely suffice, but to actually explain why we’re using these technologies is a lot harder.
Rather than addressing the public, we wanted to get them involved in the debate again. But, since it’s so far removed from their daily realities (and frankly, sometimes they just prefer not to listen), we came up with solutions that brought up the topic within unexpected settings. In several movie theatres, we installed an aquarium filled with water coming from a nuclear cooling tower and, in different art exhibitions, we installed a piece of art created by a well known artist with parts used in nuclear reactors. In both cases, people could communicate their questions or concerns via digital screens. We then used all the questions in a media campaign to instigate further questions and for each of them we gave an answer on le-nucleaire-en-clair.be

The Situation
The nuclear sector has not been the most transparant or outspoken one in the industry for the past few decades. But recent events and political decisions did force them to open up to the general public. Using this campaign we wanted to demonstrate that, in reality, the nuclear sector (energy and other applications) has nothing to hide, and is willing to answer all questions that people might have, in a transparant and open way.

The Goal
The goal of the campaign was not to change public opinion, but for the public's to at least have an informed one. Research indicates that there are a lot of myths and misunderstandings about nuclear energy and technology, and the facts easily get drowned in stereotypical outcries. So we turned things around and asked the public at large to question the sector with their concerns and questions, offering them a complete and transparant answer in return.

The Strategy
Rather than addressing the public, we wanted to get them involved in the debate again. But, since it’s so far removed from their daily realities (and frankly, sometimes they just prefer not to listen), we came up with solutions that brought up the topic within unexpected settings. In several movie theatres, we installed an aquarium filled with water coming from a nuclear cooling tower and, in different art exhibitions, we installed a piece of art created by a well known artist with parts used in nuclear reactors. In both cases, people could communicate their questions or concerns via digital screens. We then used all the questions in a media campaign to instigate further questions and for each of them we gave an answer on le-nucleaire-en-clair.be.

Execution
The first phase of the campaign consisted of the public installations: an aquarium with live fishes filled with water from the cooling towers, and a modern art installation constructed from used reactor materials. By placing these objects in high traffic areas we got the first public questions in and posted them on the website.

In the second phase we used these questions to incite a broader audience to get involved, using newspaper ads, banners, tv ads, billboarding in railway stations and boomerang postcards. Some of these sources yielded unexpected amounts of questions (stations and boomerang got record numbers), and the biggest difficulty lied in answering all these questions in a timely manner. At the time of writing though, every one of the questions, even the most awkward ones, have been answered personally by a team of specialists.

Documented Results
In total, more than 2,000 useful questions were entered, and all of them were personally answered by a team of experts. Stationcubes with interactive screens yielded 483 questions while Boomerang (a hard copy card format!) gave us 664 entries.

More than the actual questions though, the campaign got people talking about the subject again: of the people who recalled the campaign (as measured in a posttest), 1 in 10 talked about it with other people. 8% went on an active search for more informatoion about the issue and 1 in 10 visitied the website.

Written press reported on the campaign in over more than 20 articles, 9 online articles (social media activity excluded) reported on it, and 2 radioshows had specific debates on the campaign and the questions.