SEEING THE RIGHT WAY by SUPERNORMAL VOICE for Greenpeace

Adsarchive » Promo , Case study » Greenpeace » SEEING THE RIGHT WAY

SEEING THE RIGHT WAY

Pin to Collection
Add a note
Industry Charities, Foundations, Volunteers, Environmental & Animal Issues
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market South Korea
Agency SUPERNORMAL VOICE
Creative Director Sae Young Kim
Art Director Swan Song
Copywriter Swan Song
Released March 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Best Localisation Campaign
Advertiser: GREENPEACE
Product/Service: ANTI-WHALING AWARENESS
Agency: SUPERNORMAL VOICE
Date of First Appearance: Mar 8 2010 12:00AM
Entrant Company: SUPERNORMAL VOICE, Seoul, KOREA
Art Director: Swan Song (SUPERNORMALVOICE)
Creative Director: Sae Young Kim (SUPERNORMALVOICE)
Account Executive: Jin Young Seong (SUPERNORMALVOICE)
Copywriter: Swan Song (SUPERNORMALVOICE)
Media placement: Stamps & Magazines - In Public Places - 08/03/2010

Results and Effectiveness
The most meaningful point is that the Japanese received messages about whaling naturally as they read magazines. For two weeks, more than 1,000 Japanese people came across our message. About 30% of them came to the realisation that the issue of whaling is still executed in a guerrilla-fashion. The results of these efforts were astonishing, considering that Japanese normally remain unconcerned with their whaling tradition.

Creative Execution
To use Japanese magazines, we had trouble getting permission from Japanese people who supported whaling tradition. So we took it upon ourselves to create a way that did not require their permission. We came up with 'roller stamps' that were used to imprint magazines found in public places. In this way, we were able to deliver our message to a large number of Japanese people. Using roller stamps, any magazine or even cookbook could be a medium for our message, being in limitless supply. Our efficiency was therefore high, with a low overall budget.

Insights, Strategy & the Idea
Japanese people tend to think of whaling as a longstanding tradition and do not believe that whales are in danger of extinction. Therefore they do not recognise whaling as a problem. Thus, we created a new way to bring awareness to the Japanese people. We found that the Japanese traditionally read books from right to left, which is opposite to the majority of the international community. We used this tradition as our motive. That is, when the Japanese read in their way, the number of whales is getting smaller. However if the Japanese were to read the rules in the same direction as the rest of the international community they might be more willing to bring the whale numbers back up. We intend to have them rethink their opinion about whether a traditional practice is worth the extinction of the whales.