Foundation Fortisisland And Pampus Promo, Case study DUTCH SHARK ALARM by Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam

DUTCH SHARK ALARM

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Industry Museums & Libraries
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Netherlands
Agency Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam
Creative Director Darre Van Dijk En Piebe Piebenga
Producer Brenda Bentz Van Den Berg
Photographer Arno Bosma
Released June 2011

Credits & Description

Category: Media, Arts and Entertainment
Advertiser: FOUNDATION FORTISISLAND PAMPUS
Product/Service: ISLE OF PAMPUS MUSEUM
Agency: OGILVY & MATHER AMSTERDAM
Executive Creative Director: Darre Van Dijk (Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam)
Creative Director: Piebe Piebenga (Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam)
Producer: Brenda Bentz Van Den Berg (Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam)
Planner: Michel Macdonald (Ogilvy & Mather Amsterdam)
Photographer: Arno Bosma
Production: Frans Smit
: Diving Club The Whale
Model-maker: Hans Primowees
: (Plaatreclame)
Media placement: Free TV Publicity - Many Dutch Channels - June 20, 2011
Media placement: Free Print Publicity - Many Dutch Papers - June 20, 2011
Media placement: Free Online Buzz - Many Blogs, Social Media, Etc. - June 20, 2011

Summary of the Campaign
The historic island of Pampus has been struggling with a decline in visitors over the last few years. To be able to maintain this UNESCO World Heritage site in the future, visitor numbers had to be increased by 5%. 


Mystery has always surrounded Pampus. For decades incredible stories have been told about the island, and its fort - and its wandering ghosts, lost soldiers and hidden treasures. In the summer of 2011 the renewed visitor centre, where many of these stories are kept alive, opened its doors. To create awareness around the opening, another incredible story was added to the list of mysteries: The Pampus Shark.

During a 2 week period before the opening of the visitor centre a team of specialised stunt divers went into the waters circling the island with a full-scale shark fin. Normally there are no sharks in Dutch waters, so it didn’t go unnoticed: The Pampus Shark was born.



The news and footage spread quickly via Facebook and Twitter. And Pampus was soon overloaded with phone calls and website visitors. The buzz on social media was picked up by newspapers, TV channels and radio stations who seriously discussed the possibility of having a shark in Dutch waters. Even specialists were consulted. The free publicity value was over 2,000% of the money spent on the stunt. But more importantly, despite the lousy summer of 2011, visitor numbers increased by 10%, keeping Pampus and its incredible stories alive.

The Situation
An hour sailing from Amsterdam is the historic island of Pampus. Unfortunately people have forgotten that Pampus is an island and that on the island a historic fort can be visited. Besides that, Pampus is perceived as the old fashioned option to a day trip. Competition is increasing and consequently visiting numbers are dropping every year. Without enough visitors the Pampus Foundation won’t be able to maintain this UNESCO site in the future. In the summer of 2011 a new visitors' centre is opened. But how can you draw visitors, without a big budget and when people have forgotten about you?

The Goal
Put the island Pampus back on the map. By creating buzz around the island, young families with children in the age from 6 to 12 will be attracted to the island and its new visitor's centre again. The annual 5% decrease of visitors has to be turned around with an increase of 5% over 2011. Besides that, the invested 15,000 budget that was spent on development and execution of the campaign had to be redeemed in free publicity.

The Strategy
Pampus is not just an ordinary island. Throughout history it has always been surrounded by mystery. Strange stories and tales have been told over the years, about wandering ghosts, lost soldiers and hidden treasures, stories of which no-one can tell whether they are true or fictional. Families are always on the lookout for an exciting and fun day trip, an experience the family will talk about for a long time.

To emphasise its mysterious character and use the insight of family needs, we repositioned Pampus from being an informative historical site into a mysterious and exciting island that appeals to the imagination. This repositioning resulted in the new payoff: 'Pampus. Always an incredible story.' The repositioning was the starting point of the creative concept. The idea had to fit the renewed Pampus and underline its mysterious character.

Execution
Summer of 2011. Pampus opens its renewed visitor centre where many of the mysterious stories are kept alive. To bring the island and its visitors' centre into publicity, we added another incredible story to the list of mysteries: The Pampus Shark. 

During a 2-week period before the opening of the visitor centre, a team of specialised stunt divers went into the waters, circling the island with a full-scale shark fin. Normally there are no sharks in Dutch water, so it didn’t go unnoticed.

The Pampus Shark was born. To feed the buzz a bit more, a few days before the opening a surfboard was found, with a big bite taken from it. On the opening day the stunt was revealed to the press, a large billboard showed the divers with the fin. Later on, the movie Jaws was shown in a float-in cinema in Pampus harbour.

Documented Results
After the shark was spotted on the first day, a buzz started and when a video was posted on Facebook more shark sights were recorded and the news travelled fast. Pictures and videos were shared on Facebook, people discussed the news on Twitter, the number of Pampus Facebook fans tripled and the foundation received many curious phone calls.

The news was picked up by a local TV channel who turned it into a big item, inviting specialists to discuss the case. After this, the buzz really took off; newspapers dedicated articles to the shark and national TV and radio stations spent time discussing the possibility of having a shark in our waters. The Pampus website had to deal with an overload. The free publicity value was worth over 2,000% of the money spent on the stunt. But more importantly, despite the lousy weather in the 2011 summer, visitor numbers increased by 10%.