PONDER ME by Y&R New York for LG

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PONDER ME

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Industry Mobile phones, devices & accessories
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market United States
Agency Y&R New York
Director Ulf Johnansson
Executive Creative Director Ecd- Gerry Graf Gcd- Scott Vitrone, Ian Riechenthal
Creative Director Darren Moran
Art Director Jan Jaworski, Evan Benedetto
Copywriter Tara Lawall
Producer Phillipa Smith
Editor Carlos Arias
Released November 2009

Credits & Description

Category: Best Use of Other Digital Media, including Mobile Devices
Advertiser: LG ELECTRONICS
Product/Service: MOBILE PHONE MISUSE AWARENESS
Agency: Y&R
Date of First Appearance: Nov 19 2009 12:00AM
Entrant Company: Y&R, New York, USA
Entry URL: http://www.giveitaponder.com
Executive Creative Director: Ian Riechenthal (Y&R New York)
Executive Creative Director: Scott Vitrone (Y&R New York)
Creative Director: Darren Moran (Y&R New York)
Associate Creative Director/Art: Jeff Blouin (Y&R New York)
Associate Creative Director/Copy: John Battle (Y&R New York)
Art Director: Jan Jaworski (Y&R New York)
Art Director: Evan Benedetto (Y&R New York)
Copywriter: Tara Lawall (Y&R New York)
Executive Producer of Content Production: Alex Gianni (Y&R New York)
Executive Director of Content Production: Lora Schulson (Y&R New York)
Executive Director of Content Production: Nathy Aviram (Y&R New York)
Director: Ulf Johnansson (Smith & Jones Films)
Producer: Phillipa Smith (Smith & Jones Films)
Account Management: Katherine Youtsos (Y&R New York)
Account Management: Alexandra Sloane (Y&R New York)
Editor: Carlos Arias (Final Cut NY)
Media placement: i-Chat Application - Internet - 30 December 2009

Results and Effectiveness
To date, “Give It A Ponder” has garnered over 153 million media impressions in 167 countries. Independent testing (Millward Brown) shows that 87% of teens say that the campaign makes them think, “I should take time to think before sending a text because it could have negative consequences.” Buzz about “Give It A Ponder” has been featured in a wide variety of media, including The New York Post, NY Magazine, The Washington Post Online, NPR, G4 TV and on popular websites like Jezebel, Gawker, Vanity Fair and Notcot.

Creative Execution
The Give it a Ponder campaign melded social media with integrated content organically by leveraging the media channels teens navigate on a daily basis. The interconnected hub, allows teens to navigate throughout the content without losing sight of all the site offers. Utilising witty Ponder banter, The Ponder Beard navigates the user between YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, Wikipedia, and the Ponder Application for iChat. Beyond Giveitaponder.com, LG placed media where teens spend time, in cinemas, schools and malls. Through a national programme, LG was able to spread awareness about bullying using the videos on the ChannelOne network. Using digital OOH signage in malls, the Give it a Ponder campaign reached its demographic in a dynamic way. The overall interactivity of this programme was built based on primary and secondary research; therefore, it was targeted based on insights that came straight from the intended audience.

Insights, Strategy & the Idea
Reflecting the LG commitment to “Life’s Good”, the Ponder campaign attacks the growing problem of teen mobile-phone bullying. Teens and phones are inseparable. And while many teens have been victims and witnesses of mobile bullying, even more don’t report it. Traditional schoolyard bullies torment the physically weak or socially outcast. Mobile bullies harass kids in the “faster crowd”. Think tabloid culture. Perpetrators say, “Well, that girl really did puke. I was there and had to tell my friends.” Research uncovered our unique insight. Teens wouldn’t consider the victim’s feelings but would consider the personal consequences of their actions. While they thought it right to share gossip because they were reporting on something true, all could come up with an “oops” moment when they sent a text they wished they hadn’t. They would tune out if we lectured but would listen if we suggested “think before texting” in the right voice.