BEAUTIFULLY IMPERFECT for Ministry Of Community Development, Youth And Sports

BEAUTIFULLY IMPERFECT

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Industry Public awareness
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Singapore
Released May 2009

Credits & Description

Category: Public Sector
Advertiser: MINISTRY OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, YOUTH AND SPORTS
Product/Service: MARRIAGE AWARENESS CAMPAIGN
Executive Creative Director: Chris Chiu (Leo Burnett Singapore)
Executive Creative Director: Yasmin Ahmad (Leo Burnett Malaysia)
Copywriter: Yasmin Ahmad (Leo Burnett Malaysia)
Copywriter: Isaac Ho (Leo Burnett Singapore)
Art Director: Yasmin Ahmad (Leo Burnett Malaysia)
Art Director: Yeo Yen Yen (Leo Burnett Singapore)
Account Management: Kurt Viertel/Margaret Leong/Saurabh Varma/Claire Chan/Lee Min Qi/Eileen Wong/Leo (Leo Burnett Singapore)
Client: Richard Tan (Ministry of Community Development/Youth And Sports)
Media placement: TV Campaign - Channel 5, Channel 8, Suria Channel, Vasanthem Channel & Channel NewsAsia - 5 April 2009
Media placement: Cinema - Shaw Cinema, Cathay Cinema & Eng Wah Cinema - 12 April 2009
Media placement: OOH - Shaw LED Screen & Chevron House LED Screen - 12 April 2009
Media placement: TV Mobile - TV Mobile - 5 April 2009

Summary of the Campaign
In Singapore, the younger generation generally find it hard to commit to marriage, often procrastinating in the hope of finding their ideal soulmate. This campaign, created by the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports, a key ministry within the Singapore government, aimed to change people’s perceptions about what real love is, ultimately increasing the number of marriages and reducing divorce rates. By revolving the campaign around a television spot of a touching yet offbeat eulogy at a funeral, this campaign illustrated that only by embracing your partner’s imperfections can you truly experience love. In short, true and lasting love means finding perfection in imperfect people. Targetted at Singaporeans aged between 24 and 34, this campaign reached audiences via television, cinema and social media. A resounding success, the film was watched by over 2.7 million people (Singapore’s population is 4 million) in less than 20 weeks. Post research by Consumer Faces in May 2009 showed that, thanks to the campaign, 8 out of 10 people were now more open to marriage and that 6 out of 10 people now appreciated their partner more. The campaign generated an estimated US$1.5 million worth of PR coverage.

The Goal
The goal was to ultimately increase marriage rates while reducing divorce rates in the country. Our target were Singaporeans between 24 to 34 years of age.

Results
On an awareness level alone, this was Singapore’s most successful campaign – it was watched by over 2.7 million people (Singapore’s population is 4 million) in less than 20 weeks. On Facebook, the fan page drew over 17 million impressions, 17,900 fans, 120,000 unique visitors and more than 8,000 comments were posted. On YouTube, the film was the 19th most favourited video in the world and 88th most watched globally in April 2009. Post research by Consumer Faces, May 2009 showed that, thanks to the campaign, 8 out of 10 people were now more open to marriage and that 6 out of 10 people now appreciated their partner more. The entire campaign generated more than US$1.5 million worth of PR across television, print, magazine and radio.

Execution
The launch vehicle for the campaign was a three minute spot aired in cinemas and on national television on 5 April 2009. Influential bloggers and members of media were invited to a pre-release screening. We then launched the Beautifully Imperfect Facebook page on 7 April 2009. We encouraged couples to submit their own Beautifully Imperfect stories and photos, which culminated in a competition held at Sentosa Beach on 16 May 2009.

The Situation
The Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports is a key ministry within the Singapore government. Its mission is to build a cohesive and socially resilient society by nurturing family bonds. In 2009, marriage rates in Singapore reached all new lows while divorce rates were higher than they’d ever been, and this troubled the Ministry.

The Strategy

To change perceptions and behaviour, we knew that we had to engage Singaporeans on a strong, emotional level, but without the usual preaching that is often typical of government campaigns. Additionally, our target audience is one of the most connected and tech savvy in the world. To reach out to them, our communication strategy heavily leveraged social media channels, from blogging to YouTube to Facebook.