WORLD'S THICKEST BOOK by Inkognito for Min A-Kasse

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WORLD'S THICKEST BOOK

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Industry Social Services
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market Denmark
Agency Inkognito
Executive Creative Director Thomas Kolster
Released April 2011

Credits & Description

Category: Best Use of Live Events and/or Stunts
Advertiser: MIN A-KASSE
Product/Service: UNEMPLOYMENT FUND
Agency: INKOGNITO
Executive Creative Director: Thomas Kolster (Inkognitocph)
Cmo: Simon Bauer (Min A-Kasse)
Media placement: Stunt/Event/Public Affairs - In dif. national media and around the country - 01.04.2011

Summary of the Campaign

The unemployment fund, Min A-kasse, wanted to lobby against a bureaucracy run amok. Through research, a strong case against bureaucracy was made; Min A-kasse found that the unemployment rules had exploded from 421 pages in 1951 to 23,675 pages in 2011. To make something as abstract as bureaucracy tangible, we turned the many pages into the world’s thickest book. The book weighs 64 kilograms and is 134-centimetres thick - the average weight of a woman and the height of a pygmy. This is something that no politician can defend. The book toured Denmark; beginning at the parliament and on to the National Danish Library, political party meetings and so on.

We succeeded turning the book and its 23,675 pages into a powerful argument against bureaucracy, sparking an inquiry in Parliament. The Deputy Prime Minister, the Minister of Unemployment, the Leader of the Liberal Party, as well as mayors, politicians and ministers across all parties endorsed our campaign; arguing for deregulation. The Minister of Unemployment has invited all parties to discuss deregulation in May.

The campaign has been featured multiple times on both national TV channels and in every serious newspaper in Denmark. It’s even attracted foreign media attention from the BBC, amongst others.

Furthermore, Min A-kasse has had a triple increase in members and the campaign raised awareness in the population by 18%. The book is still touring Denmark to further rally for less bureaucracy, which means more time to help people back to work and a fairer system.

The Situation

The unemployment fund, Min A-kasse, has a vision to 'be on their members’ side'. In a 2011 survey, they discovered that 80% of the work force believed that the unemployment system was over-bureaucratic. Through research, Min A-kasse also found that the unemployment rules and regulations had exploded from 421 pages in 1951 to 23,675 pages in 2011 – a strong case against bureaucracy. Min A-kasse, who are daily administering these rules, decided to lobby the policy makers to create less bureaucracy and a fairer system, where Min A-kasse could concentrate on getting people back to work instead of on administration.

The Goal
With their shocking research showing that the unemployment rules and regulations had grown to 23,675 pages, Min A-kasse had a clear and concise argument against bureaucracy. They wanted to use these findings actively to influence the political reality and to inform the press and the general public about a bureaucracy that had grown out of hand. Now, they just had to make this bureaucratic mess more tangible.

The Strategy
We wanted to target key political decision makers across parties and get them to support deregulation. It’s not the first time politicians have been accused of bureaucracy, so we had to come up with an original strategy to get the media’s and the politician’s attention. We turned our research - proving the rules and regulations had run amok to a staggering 23,375 pages - into a simple and visual argument for less bureaucracy: the world’s biggest book. Our call for deregulation was no longer about intangible figures or abstract bureaucracy, but it was a solid, visual proof that both the public and the media could relate to – and no politician could defend.

Execution
To kick off the campaign, we printed the 23,675 pages on a basic printer and live-streamed it to our Facebook fan page; it took 12 consecutive days of non-stop printing. By this time, the press and politicians were already on to the campaign. Then, a group of unemployed persons made the world’s thickest book out of the many pages, which again was documented on our live stream. The book weighs 64 kilograms and is more than 134 centimetres thick - the average weight of a woman and the height of a pygmy. It has since toured most of Denmark beginning at the parliament and onwards to the National Danish Library, conferences, political party meetings, local libraries, public squares and is still continuing its rally against bureaucracy; creating support from all sides of the political spectrum, from mayors to the Deputy Prime Minister.

Documented Results
We succeeded in turning the world’s thickest book into an argument so powerful that the politicians endorsed our campaign across the political spectrum, beginning with an inquiry in parliament. Our campaign gained support from the Deputy Prime Minister, the Leader of the Liberal Party, spokespersons of the Labour Market Committee across 7 parties and many other politicians, all promising deregulation. The Minister of Unemployment has invited all parties, unions and employer organisations to discuss deregulation in May.

The campaign has been featured multiple times on all national TV channels and in every highly-regarded newspaper in Denmark. It’s even attracted foreign media attention, from BBC among others.

Furthermore, Min A-kasse has had a triple increase in membership and raised awareness in the population by 18%. The book still tours Denmark to further rally for less bureaucracy, meaning more time to help people back to work and a fairer system.