END PUPPY MILLS - NEWSPAPERS by BBDO San Francisco for Society For The Prevention Of Cruelty To Animals (SPCA)

END PUPPY MILLS - NEWSPAPERS

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Industry Environmental & Animal Issues
Media Promo & PR, Case study
Market United States
Agency BBDO San Francisco
Executive Creative Director Mike Mckay
Creative Director Bryan Houlette
Art Director Maya Renz, Sara Nicely
Copywriter Aryan Aminzadeh
Account Supervisor Jill Rohde
Released April 2012

Credits & Description

Category: Charities, Public Health & Safety, Public Awareness Messages
Advertiser: SF SPCA
Product/Service: END PUPPY MILLS
Agency: BBDO SAN FRANCISCO
EVP Director Of Strategy: Matt Herrmann (BBDO San Francisco)
Creative Director: Bryan Houlette (BBDO San Francisco)
Copywriter: Aryan Aminzadeh (BBDO San Francisco)
Art Director: Sara Nicely (BBDO San Francisco)
VP Production Solutions: Louise Doherty (BBDO San Francisco)
Brand Strategist: Renee Zalles (BBDO San Francisco)
Account Supervisor: Jill Rohde (BBDO San Francisco)
Account Executive: Jennifer Wantuch (BBDO San Francisco)
Chairman: Jim Lesser (BBDO San Francisco)
Executive Creative Director: Mike Mckay (BBDO San Francisco)
Managing Director: Brent Smart (BBDO San Francisco)
Art Director: Maya Renz (BBDO San Francisco)
Media placement: Newspaper Bin - San Francisco - 27 April 2012
Media placement: Digital Screen - San Francisco - 27 April 2012

Insights, Strategy & the Idea
San Francisco has a rich history of social consciousness. But when it comes to getting new pets, a lot of people in the city buy dogs online without knowing they come from puppy mills with terrible conditions.

So our challenge was to end the cycle of puppy mills by encouraging local shelter dog adoptions and educating SF residents about the realities of buying dogs online. This awareness campaign was targeted towards aspiring pet-owners in SF.

Creative Execution
We placed a ubiquitous newspaper bin in the middle of town. But instead of newspapers, it appeared to have a bunch of puppies inside. The tight, over-crowded quarters of the space represented the shocking conditions that puppy mill dogs live in.

Inside the bins, puppy mill-centric newspapers revealed that many dogs purchased online come from conditions like those in the video.
The newspapers also included other articles about the dangers of buying dogs online, along with the suggestion to adopt a local dog instead.

Results and Effectiveness
By talking to our target while they were in the process of looking for puppies to purchase, we were able to encourage many people to adopt rather than buy a dog. The site sparked an important conversation about the benefits of adopting dogs locally.
The stats:
• 77,000 visitors to the site the first two weeks it was live.
• 84 million impressions