TRACES OF FREEDOM by Black Magic Marker for NATIONAAL COMITÉ 4 EN 5 MEI (DUTCH INSTITUTE FOR WAR REMEMBRANCE)

TRACES OF FREEDOM

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Industry Public awareness
Media Promo & PR
Market Netherlands
Agency Black Magic Marker
Art Director Rene Klinkhamer
Copywriter Alexander Zwart
Producer Fiona Jacob, Amanda Vollenweider, Paul Van Der Meer
Released March 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Best Use of Ambient in a Promotional Campaign
Advertiser: NATIONAAL COMITÉ 4 EN 5 MEI (DUTCH INSTITUTE FOR WAR REMEMBRANCE)
Product/Service: FREEDOM AWARENESS
Agency: BLACK MAGIC MARKER
Date of First Appearance: Mar 31 2010
Entrant Company: BLACK MAGIC MARKER, Amsterdam, THE NETHERLANDS
Entry URL: http://www.otheradvertising.nl/traces/
Agency: Black Magic Marker (Black Magic Marker)
Creative Director/ Concept: Femke Schavemaker (Black Magic Marker)
Art Director: Rene Klinkhamer (Black Magic Marker)
Visual Designer: Bo van Veen (Black Magic Marker)
Copywriter: Alexander Zwart (Black Magic Marker)
Flash Designer: Jeroen Lam (Black Magic Marker)
Producer: Fiona Jacob (Black Magic Marker)
Producer: Amanda Vollenweider (Black Magic Marker)
Managing Director: Annick Benerink (Black Magic Marker)
Brand Manager: Hanneke van Kempen (Black Magic Marker)
Producer: Paul van der Meer (Paul van der Meer Consultancy)
Media placement: Train - The Netherlands - 31 March 2010
Media placement: Website - The Netherlands - 31 March 2010
Media placement: Advertisements - The Netherlands - 31 March 2010
Media placement: Outdoor - The Netherlands - 31 March 2010

Describe the objective of the promotion.
As everyone lives in the fast lane nowadays, how do you get them to take a minute to consider freedom? Simple: catch them at the one place they stand still. In the year that the Netherlands celebrates the 65th anniversary of their liberation, a specially redesigned train raced through the country. The 'freedom train' crossed the whole country and was accessible to all, from interested visitors to unsuspecting passengers on their way home. Inside the train, footage was shown about freedom relating to the place the train was passing. People could also consult an interactive world map and much more.

Describe how the promotion developed from concept to implementation.
Inside the train, footage was shown about (un)freedom, related to the place the train was passing at the moment. Next to that people could consult an interactive world map about peace missions worldwide. The campaign (train, website and promotion for the train) was designed in such a way that you actually had to stop to discover the text the images were made of. The design of the outdoor and print campaign was in line with the train, making them easily recognisable. The accompanying website is still online, speeding across your screen until you delve into the content: stilstaanbijvrijheid.nl

Explain why the method of promotion was most relevant to the product or service.
After the Second World War, the Dutch Institute for War Remembrance was committed to constantly raise awareness that freedom is not self-evident. To celebrate the 65th anniversary of the Dutch liberation, the Institute asked for a concept to get people throughout the whole country to reflect on freedom. But how do you ask people that live at full speed to take a minute and think about something that abstract? Simple: catch them at the one place they stand still. In the year that the Netherlands celebrated the 65th anniversary of their liberation, a specially redesigned train raced through the country.

Describe the success of the promotion with both client and consumer including some quantifiable results.
The campaign proved to be such a success that on the last day of the campaign (Liberation Day), more than 6 million people watched the marathon broadcast with reports from the train, live. During the course of the campaign, 40% of the Dutch population heard or read something about the freedom train. Spontaneous posts by visitors on YouTube, twitter, etc. also created a buzz. Since the goal was to raise awareness, you could easily say the results exceeded all expectations. Because of this huge success, the train was (unexpectedly) exhibited at the Dutch Railway Museum after the campaign ended.