Toshiba Radio BEETHOVEN'S EAR by Dentsu Inc. Tokyo

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BEETHOVEN'S EAR

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Industry Electronic Devices & Home Appliances, Computers & Computer Accessories
Media Radio
Market Japan
Agency Dentsu Inc. Tokyo
Director Sachiko Nakayama
Creative Director Hidenori Fukuoka, Mr.yukio Nakayama
Released March 2004

Credits & Description

Advertising Agency: DENTSU, JAPAN, Tokyo
Creative Director: Yukio Nakayama/Hidenori Fukuoka
Scriptwriter: Sachiko Nakayama
Agency Producer: Mariko Tanabe
Advertiser's Supervisor: Fumio Katsuura
Director: Sachiko Nakayama
Sound Engineer: Yoshito Morita

Script in English
SFX: Music baton snaps as it breaks.
VO: Right now, we're bending Beethoven's Ear. We call it a baton. But for Beethoven, it was a tool, a part of his ear, which allowed him to listen to sound.
When Beethoven became deaf at age 28, he found a way to hear sound. Holding his baton between his teeth, he pressed this stick against a musical instrument. Then, his teeth and skull bones picked up vibrations from the instrument.
This is called bone conduction sound. Helen Keller also seemed to enjoy music by touching her fingers to music instruments or speakers.
Would you like to hear music running through your bones? Toshiba's bone conduction headphones use a system that allows anyone — both those who can and can't hear sound — to enjoy music. Because these headphones don't cover your ears, even while you are immersed in music.
SFX: Ding-dong (door bell rings).
VO: Oh, someone is at the door. You can clearly hear sound around you. When you think about it, Beethoven composed and heard his own music through bone conduction sound. We'd like you to experience this sound - but you would need bone conduction headphones.
Toshiba bone conduction headphones.
Brief Explanation
When Beethoven became deaf at age 28, he found a way to hear sound. Holding his baton between his teeth, he pressed this stick against a musical instrument. Vibrations from the instrument were picked up by his teeth and skull bones, becoming what is called bone conduction sound. Now, to hear this type of sound, we need a new type of headphone technology. Accordingly, Toshiba has created bone conduction headphones to recreate sound as Beethoven heard it — allowing our ears to hear like Beethoven's Ear.