LEG OVER by TBWA\Hunt\Lascaris Johannesburg for Colman's

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LEG OVER

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Industry Sauces
Media Radio
Market South Africa
Agency TBWA\Hunt\Lascaris Johannesburg
Director Nicholas Hulley, Nadja Lossgott
Executive Creative Director Damon Stapleton
Creative Director Adam Weber
Producer Alison Ross
Production Opus
Released August 2012

Credits & Description

Category: Foods
Advertiser: TIGER BRANDS
Product/Service: COLMAN'S HOT ENGLISH MUSTARD
Agency: TBWA\HUNT\LASCARIS JOHANNESBURG
Executive Creative Director: Damon Stapleton
Creative Director: Adam Weber
Scriptwriter: Nicholas Hulley/Nadja Lossgott
Agency Producer: Alison Ross
Account Manager: Rosa Leigh
Production Company: OPUS, Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA
Director: Nicholas Hulley/Nadja Lossgott
Producer: Alison Ross
Sound Studio: Opus
Sound Engineer: Charles Pantland
Date of First Appearance: Jan 1 1900 12:00AM
Entrant Company: TBWA\HUNT\LASCARIS JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

Full script of the ad IN ENGLISH, REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE AD
SFX: Music: 'Rule Britannia' ANN: Ah, the English summer. Thoughts turn to Shelley, Shakespeare, Byron. British men of passion; romantics who could make women swoon with the quill. MVO: Here, love... ANN: But alas, today... MVO: Fancy a bit of leg-over? FVO: Yeah, why not. MVO: Marvellous. FVO: Hold your horses, wait 'til we get home, Romeo. MVO: But I’m going down the pub later! SFX: Music: 'Rule Britannia' ANN: Yes. Well, all is not lost, we still have our mustard, our Colman's Hot English Mustard. It's hot and, by god, it's English. Quite possibly the hottest thing left in the British Empire.

Brief Explanation
Colman’s Hot English Mustard is a staple condiment on the South African table. Our parents, our grandparents and their parents all had it on their table. It is hot and feels typically English. It conjures up the England of Churchill and the Battle of Britain; it makes you think of the Empire and Rule Britannia; of the Bulldog spirit and vim and vigour. Alas, this is not the England of today, with its hoodies, teen pregnancies and council flats. Which makes Colman’s a nostalgic relic, and probably the hottest thing left in the British Empire.