REMEMBER THE BOYS by Cheetham Bell J. Walter Thompson UK for Scruffs

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REMEMBER THE BOYS

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Industry Clothing
Media Radio
Market United Kingdom
Agency Cheetham Bell J. Walter Thompson UK
Creative Director Andy Cheetham
Production 422
Released August 2010

Credits & Description

Category: Best Scriptwriting
Advertiser: BIRCHWOOD PRICE TOOLS
Product/Service: SCRUFFS WORK WEAR
Agency: JWT CHEETHAMBELL
Creative Director: Andy Cheetham
Scriptwriter: Andrew Dobbie/James Ashworth
Agency Producer: Bridget Pelicias
Account Manager: Henry Monsell
Production Company: 422, Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Other Credits: Voiceover: Alan Ford
Date of First Appearance: Jan 1 1900 12:00AM
Entrant Company: JWT CHEETHAMBELL, Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM

Full script of the ad IN ENGLISH, REGARDLESS OF THE ORIGINAL LANGUAGE OF THE AD
MVO: Man Tip 2, from Scruffs Work Wear: Remember The Boys. SFX: Café door opening; café ambience MVO: You’re getting bacon sarnies for the boys on-site, but Chantelle, the lovely little thing behind the counter, ain’t stopped flirting since you strutted in wearing Scruffs. She’s mustard and can’t wait to find out if you’re a bap or a muffin man. But crumpet ain’t on the menu! Make your excuses, soldier, and get back to the boys pronto. Besides, the quicker you tear yourself away from Chantelle’s service hatch, the sooner you’ll be back to find out what her evening specials are. Just don’t forget to wear your Scruffs! SFX: Coins being dropped into till; till being closed MVO: For more Man Tips visit scruffs.com Scruffs. Look good when you’re getting dirty.

Brief Explanation
‘Banter’, a term used to describe activities or chat that is playful, intelligent and original. It is inherently English...’, Urbandictionary.com Scruffs radio campaign talked to British tradesmen listening to a sports station while on-site. These guys love banter (especially about girls). ‘Man Tips’ are humorous bits of advice delivered by recognised actor Alan Ford, famous for his role as a tough East London (Cockney) gangster. From his elevated hard-guy status he offers advice to lads, using cockney rhyming slang and innuendo to get round RACC restrictions and talk credibly in the vernacular of our audience.