ART NEVER SEEN DDB Warsaw para Audiodescription Foundation

ART NEVER SEEN

Añadir a la colección
Añadir una nota
Sector Organizaciones benéficas, fundaciones, voluntarios
Media Promo / PR, Case study
Mercado Polonia
Agencia DDB Warsaw
Creative Director Maciej Waligóra, Zuzanna Duchniewska-Sobczak - Ddb Warsaw
Art Director Magdalena Drozdowska
Copywriter Mateusz Ksiazek
Publicado agosto 2011

Creditos y descripciones

Category: Best Use of Live Events and/or Stunts
Advertiser: AUDIODESCRIPTION FOUNDATION
Product/Service: AUDIO DESCRIPTION AWARENESS
Agency: DDB WARSAW
Creative Director: Maciej Waligora (DDB Warsaw)
Creative Director: Zuzanna Duchniewska-Sobczak (DDB Warsaw)
Art Director: Magdalena Drozdowska (DDB Warsaw)
Copywriter: Mateusz Ksiazek (DDB Warsaw)
Account Executive: Natalia Wolska (DDB Warsaw)
Head Of Creative Solution: Kasia Seyfried (DDB Warsaw)
Business Developement Director: Marta Macke (DDB Warsaw)
Audio Description Consultant: Barbara Szymanska (Audiodescription Foundation)
Board Member: Tomasz Strzyminski (Audiodescription Foundation)
Voice Over Artist: Arek Jakubik
Media placement: Digital PR - Facebook - 15 August 2011
Media placement: Radio PR - Polish Radio 3, Polish Radio 2, Radio Dla Ciebie - 24 August 2011
Media placement: Event - Leto Gallery, Warsaw - 25 August 2011
Media placement: Radio PR: Audio Description Broadcast - TOK FM - 25 August 2011
Media placement: Consumer PR - TVP2, Rzeczpospolita, Polska The Times, Polish Radio 2, Onet.pl, Gazeta.pl, Polsat, Życie Warszawy - 26 August 2011

Summary of the Campaign
An exhibition and auction titled 'Art Never Seen'. The aim of the event was to promote audio descriptions in Poland. The campaign was targeting museum keepers as well as the general public.

As an outcome we raised enough money to run an audio description courses for museum keepers in all larger cities. The event was covered by media and it was a detailed covarage making people realise that visually impaired can participate in visual arts.

The Situation
Audio description is a narrative technique that makes visual art accessible to blind and low-vision people.

It translates pictures into words. Unfortunately only few museums in Poland provide audio description recordings and most people don’t even know what audio description is. Our brief was to make the public and museums aware.

The Goal
The primary target group were museum keepers who did not have enough skill or knowledge to provide audio descriptions in their museums. We had to find a way to teach them. The secondary group was the general public - people who didn't even realise that visualy impaired individuals can enjoy the arts.

The Strategy
We did not want the public or museum workers to take pity on the blind. Just the opposite! The strategy was to engage sighted people, show them the beauty of audio description recordings and let them experience and truly enjoy this technique.

Execution
We organised an exhibition and auction titled 'Art Never Seen'. We asked leading Polish visual artists to donate their latest works. Then we described the works and recorded the audio descriptions. Using social media, radio and artists themselves we created buzz around the works and invited people promising that they would be able to see and buy the best of contemporary arts.

People expected an interesting but, normal art event. But, in the gallery, instead of paintings, visitors found only empty walls, titles, headphones and players. They could listen to the audio descriptions and see the art using just ears and imagination - exactly as blind people do. The works were also put up for auction. Bidders judged their value only by listening to the audio descriptions. Auction winners got the originals but only after the event.

Documented Results
The bids exceeded the market value of the works.

We raised enough money to organise audio description courses for museum-keepers in all larger cities.

Radio stations broadcast the audio descriptions making the event a nation-wide experience.

Public TV prime time news, detailed articles in major newspapers and web portals made the public realise that the visually impaired can also experience the joy of arts.